Ray Wylie Hubbard’s “Snake Farm” – A Twisted Tale of Temptation and Southern Grit

Ray Wylie Hubbard’s “Snake Farm” about the song and lyrics

Ray Wylie Hubbard's

Ray Wylie Hubbard, the iconic Texas singer-songwriter, has left an indelible mark on the music industry with his gritty storytelling and undeniable authenticity.

One of his most famous songs, “Snake Farm,” released in 2006, stands as a testament to Hubbard’s ability to craft compelling narratives that resonate with listeners.

With its infectious rhythm, clever wordplay, and darkly humorous undertones, “Snake Farm” has become a beloved classic in Hubbard’s extensive discography.

The Tale Unraveled:

“Snake Farm” kicks off with a pulsating rhythm guitar and Hubbard’s signature growl, instantly drawing listeners into a world shrouded in mystery and temptation.

The song revolves around a peculiar place called the “Snake Farm,” a real-life reptile sanctuary located in New Braunfels, Texas, known for its exotic creatures and unusual ambiance.

In the verses, Hubbard introduces various characters who are irresistibly drawn to the Snake Farm’s forbidden allure.

There’s a preacher, a police chief, a truck driver, and even a biker, all succumbing to the magnetic pull of this eccentric establishment.

Through his vivid storytelling, Hubbard captures the essence of human nature, the yearning for excitement, and the potential consequences of giving in to temptation.

Symbolism and Metaphor:

While the “Snake Farm” might initially seem like a literal location, Hubbard masterfully infuses the song with symbolism and metaphor, leaving room for interpretation.

On one level, the snake farm represents a place of vice and indulgence, a sanctuary where societal norms are cast aside.

It embodies the allure of the forbidden and the allure of giving in to our primal desires.

Furthermore, the snakes themselves serve as a metaphor for the dangerous allure of temptation.

Hubbard cleverly weaves in lines like “well, the snakes are looking real thin/they haven’t been fed since god knows when” to emphasize the potential consequences of yielding to our baser instincts.

The snake, a powerful symbol of deception and temptation throughout history, becomes a central motif that carries the narrative forward.

Ray Wylie Hubbard’s Signature Style:

Ray Wylie Hubbard’s unique musical style shines through in “Snake Farm.” The song incorporates elements of blues, rock, and traditional country, creating a captivating blend that perfectly complements the story’s dark and mysterious themes.

Hubbard’s distinctive vocals, paired with his impeccable guitar work, add an additional layer of authenticity to the track.

“Snake Farm” stands as a testament to Ray Wylie Hubbard’s songwriting prowess and his ability to create compelling narratives that transcend genres.

With its infectious rhythm, clever wordplay, and evocative storytelling, the song has become a fan favorite and a staple in Hubbard’s live performances.

Beyond its surface-level charm, “Snake Farm” delves into the depths of human nature, exploring the allure of temptation and the potential consequences of giving in to our desires.

Ray Wylie Hubbard’s ability to infuse symbolism and metaphor into his lyrics elevates the song to a higher level, inviting listeners to ponder the complexities of life and the choices we make.

“Snake Farm” is a testament to Hubbard’s enduring legacy as a true storyteller and a purveyor of genuine American music.

Its timeless appeal continues to captivate audiences, solidifying its place among the pantheon of great songs in the singer-songwriter’s illustrious career.

Ray Wylie Hubbard's

Ray Wylie Hubbard Snake Farm Lyrics

Well a woman I love is named Ramona
She kinda looks like Tempest Storm
And she can dance like little Egypt
She works down at the snake farm

Snake Farm – it just sounds nasty
Snake Farm – well it pretty much is
Snake Farm – it’s a reptile house
Snake Farm – Uuuggghhhhh…

Well Ramona’s got a keen sense of humor
She got a tattoo down her arm
It’s of a python eatin’ a little mouse
Wearin’ a sailor hat that says snake farm

Snake Farm – it just sounds nasty
Snake Farm – well it pretty much is
Snake Farm – it’s a reptile house
Snake Farm – Uuuggghhhhh…

I asked Ramona how come she works there
She says it’s got it’s charms
Nothing to do in the winter
Now and then some kid gets bit at the snake farm

Snake Farm – it just sounds nasty
Snake Farm – well it pretty much is
Snake Farm – it’s a reptile house
Snake Farm – Uuuggghhhhh…

Well Ramona likes her malt liquor
And a band from Wales thats called The Alarm
She said she cried when they broke up
She still plays their records at the snake farm

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Snake Farm – it just sounds nasty
Snake Farm – well it pretty much is
Snake Farm – it’s a reptile house
Snake Farm – Uuuggghhhhh…

Sometimes Ramona calls me up
And says come on down here, it’s getting warm
She runs everybody off
And we… you know… it’s a snake farm

Snake Farm – it just sounds nasty
Snake Farm – well it pretty much is
Snake Farm – it’s a reptile house
Snake Farm – Uuuggghhhhh…

Snake Farm – it just sounds nasty
Snake Farm – well it pretty much is
Snake Farm – it’s a reptile house
Snake Farm – Uuuggghhhhh…

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